Are you using the correct nail file?

Have you ever searched for nail files, confused and daunted by which file is the best to use. When all you want is a nail file to repair that broken nail?

Your not alone, in my early days of mastering nail techniques, I was always confused and often bought the wrong nail file type for my needs. So now the easiest way to remember, is to tell myself that nail files are like a form of sandpaper.

They come in many types from super rough to super fine and it all depends on what you plan on using the nail file for.

Most nail technicians use five different nail files at any one time. But to put simply, the lower the grit value, the coarser the file.

Grit types:

80 grit – this is very coarse and rough. This kind of file should never ever be used to file natural nails. Because of the roughness, this file should only be used on artificial nails but some nail technicians would still consider this file grit too rough to use.

100 grit – although slightly less coarse this is still too rough for natural nails but is ideal for filing artificial nails.

180 grit. Standard nail file for natural nails.

180 grit – the perfect grit for shaping natural nails on both fingers and toes.

240 grit – this is smoother than the others making it ideal for buffing natural nails to a smooth finish. If you suffer from damaged or brittle nails, this size file would be ideal to shape the nail.

500 grit – this super fine grit is used to buff and polish the nail.


Example of a 500 grit nail file to polish the nail bed.

 

Glass nail files

A few would argue these types are the best for filing natural nails. They are easier to keep clean, pretty and last a lot longer than the standard emery board nail file. Using a glass file is a personal choice. But personally, for everyday use I do always keep one in my handbag for emergency nail breakages.

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Clever Petals: Lifestyle & Beauty Blog. Your first stop for beauty, nails, home, health and general lifestyle tips. 💕

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